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Piaget’s inside story
Economy

Piaget’s inside story

Friday, 11 May 2012
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Christophe Roulet
Editor-in-chief, HH Journal

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3 min read

Opened in 1959, Piaget’s Geneva store has adopted the company’s new interior design concept. Marked by discreet elegance in a pleasant and refined atmosphere, this environment is an invitation to share the Piaget experience, which now includes acclaimed jazz singer Melody Gardot who embodies the new line of jewellery in the Rose collection.

“A brand must be a source of inspiration, which implies intelligent communication and a distinct environment that heightens its appeal.” Philippe Léopold-Metzger, chief executive of Piaget, couldn’t have made himself clearer when presenting the store in Geneva, which has been remodelled to the company’s new interior design concept. This same concept will be extended to all new points of sale and future renovations. That Geneva was chosen to showcase this environment should come as no surprise. For twenty years, the boutique which opened in 1959 on Rue du Rhône was the one and only destination for Piaget’s creations, including the first jewellery by a company which until then had been renowned for its timepieces.

Expressing the two sides of Piaget

This new environment has been crafted down to the last detail under the stewardship of Christine Querlioz at Atelier Sasha in Paris. She has imagined “a contemporary setting where fine craftsmanship and elegance come beautifully together to express the wealth of the brand, from the ultimate discretion of the Altiplano watch and the intricacy of its masterful mechanisms to fine jewellery creations. This new concept conveys Piaget’s pioneering spirit and immense savoir-faire, but also the creativity and individuality that are part of its culture.”

Over ten years the brand has implemented a worldwide portfolio of 75 boutiques.

From this single point of sale, Piaget began its expansion andante. A second boutique saw daylight in Monaco in 1980, followed a full eleven years later by Paris and Kuala Lumpur. Next came Hong Kong in 1994, then New York in 1996 and several openings in Japan from 1998. Then, at the turn of the century, Philippe Léopold-Metzger stepped up the tempo. From eleven points of sale in the late 1990s, rising to fifteen in 2000, over ten years the brand has implemented a worldwide portfolio of 75 boutiques which it has balanced between new territories, led by Asia, and landmark cities such as London and now Zurich. The new architectural concept crowns this fabulous ascension. “By rolling out this new concept, we are expressing in the most balanced way possible the two sides of Piaget whose expertise stands out in watchmaking and jewellery, but also its sophisticated and aspirational identity,” Philippe Léopold-Metzger observed.

The sound of jazz

Alongside the unveiling of the Geneva boutique’s new decor, Philippe Léopold-Metzger talked further about the brand’s partnership with Melody Gardot, the rising star of jazz and now the face of Piaget’s Rose jewellery, an iconic collection for the past thirty years. The Absence, her new album due out at end May, includes a cover version of La Vie en Rose, the legendary song which Edith Piaf recorded in 1947. In the video, to be released in June, Melody Gardot is draped in Piaget jewellery against a backdrop of an incredible seven thousand roses. “When we associate ourselves with an artist, we of course want her to embody our products. More importantly, she must share our philosophy,” Philippe Léopold-Metzger declared. “This is the case with Melody Gardot whom we will accompany on her 200-date tour which begins in July.” Music to the ears.

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